Open main menu

The Nieuport 11 Bébé was a small, nimble fighter that helped turn the "Fokker Scourge" of 1915. Arriving at the front in January 1916, it eventually was supplied to 21 French Escadrilles, including N124, which would later become the Lafayette Escadrille. The N11 outclassed the Fokker Eindeckers in maneuverability, but it was limited in firepower by the top-wing mounted Lewis gun. In mid-1916, it began be replaced by the re-engined Nieuport 16, to which it was very similar. Most N11's were phased out of combat duty by the end of 1916. But it was the N11 that turned the tide and many of France's most famous aces started their career in the Bébé.

Nieuport 11
Nieuport 11 WoW.JPG
Role Fighter
Manufacturer Nieuport
Introduction 5 Jan 1916[1]
Primary users Roundel of the French Air Force before 1945.svg France
ItalianRoundelGreen.png Italy
RAF Type A Roundel.svg U.K. (RNAS)
Roundel of Belgium.svg Belgium
Imperial Russian Aviation Roundel.svg Russia
Wingspan 7.54 m (24 ft 9 in) [2]
Engine 80hp Le Rhône 9C rotary
or 80hp Gnome Monosoupape rotary
Armament top-wing Lewis
Crew 1
Max Speed 152 km/h (94 mph)[3] or 156 km/h (97 mph)[4] or 162 km/h (101 mph)[5]
Climb 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in 4:00[3]-5:00[2]
2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 8:30[5]-10:00[3]-11:00[2]
3,000 m (9,840 ft) in 15:00[5]-18:00[2]-19:00[3]
Ceiling 4,500 m (14,800 ft)[3]
to 4,600 m (15,100 ft)[4]
to 5,000 m (16,400 ft)[5]
to 5,500 m (18,000 ft)[2]
Range 250 km (160 mi)[5]
Endurance 2:00[3] to 2:30[5][4][2]

The Nieuport 11 was also used in large numbers by Italy, where they were license-built by Macchi; and Russia by Dux. Small numbers were also used by Belgium, Serbia, and the RNAS.

For more information, see Wikipedia:Nieuport 11.

Game DataEdit

Wings of GloryEdit

Official Stats
Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb
         
E B 10 11 4

Plane and Crew CardsEdit

Card LinksEdit

Blue Max/Canvas EaglesEdit

Miniatures and ModelsEdit

1:144 ScaleEdit

1:285/6mm/1:288 ScaleEdit

1:350 ScaleEdit

ResourcesEdit

Orthographic DrawingsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Notes
Citations
  1. Davilla, p.360.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Lamberton, pp.216-217.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 Durkota, p.358.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Munson, p.60.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 Davilla, p.364.
Bibliography
  • Dr. James J. Davilla and Arthur M. Soltan. French Aircraft of the First World War. Flying Machines Press, 1997. ISBN 0-9637110-4-0.
  • Alan Durkota, Thomas Darcey, and Victor Kulikov. The Imperial Russian Air Service. Flying Machines Press, 1995. ISBN 0-9637110-2-4
  • W.M. Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman, Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Great Britain: Harleyford Publications Limited, 1960.
  • Kenneth Munson, Fighters 1914-19, Attack and Training Aircraft. New York: MacMillan Publishing Co., Inc., 1976. ISBN 0713707607