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Flugzeubau Friedrichshafen GmbH Manzell. built both twin-engine bombers and a long series of seaplanes. It was founded in 1912 by an associate of von Zeppelin, Theodor Kober, and it focused at first on seaplane development. Later, in 1915, twin-engine bombers were added, and they shared the reputation for toughness that the seaplanes had established. [1]

Production aircraft from the Great War or shortly thereafter include:

ReferencesEdit

Notes
  1. In all, 491 FF.33s of all forms were built.[2]
  2. The FF.35 was a prototype twin-engine torpedo bomber that did not go into production.[3]
  3. The FF.40 was a prototype twin-engine tractor that did not go into production.[4]
  4. The FF.43 was a prototype single-seat seaplane fighter, but it was not put into production.[5]
  5. The FF.53 was a torpedo-carrier based on the FF.35 with the 260hp Mercedes engine. Three numbers were allocated but little else is known.[4]
  6. The FF.60 was a giant seaplane with a 33 m (108 ft) wingspan. Two were ordered and one completed, but it is presumed to have crashed.[4]
  7. The FF.63 was a small prototype floatplane.[4]
  8. The FF.64 was a foldable floatplane to aid commerce raiding. Three were ordered and one completed, but it was late in 1918. [4]
Citations
  1. Grosz'97, p.1.
  2. Nowarra, p.38.
  3. Nowarra, p.40.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 Nowarra, p.71.
  5. Nowarra, p.42.
Bibliography
  • Peter Gray and Owen Thetford. German Aircraft of the First World War. Great Britain, Putnam, 1962, 1987. ISBN 0-85177-809-7.
  • P.M. Grosz, Windsock Datafile 65: Fdh G.III~IIIa. Great Britain: Albatros Publications Ltd., 1997. ISBN 0-948414-97-9
  • W.M. Lamberton and E.F. Cheesman, Reconnaissance & Bomber Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Great Britain: Harleyford Publications Ltd., 1962.
  • Heinz J. Nowarra, Bruce Robertson, and Peter G. Cooksley. Marine Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Letchworth, Herts, England: Harleyford Publications Limited, 1966. ISBN 0900435070