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Hydravions Franco-British Aviation (F.B.A.) built several flying boats during WWI, and the Type H was the most numerous. In fact, it may have been the most numerous flying boat of the entire war, with 982 built in Italy and several hundred in France. It was a development of the Type B airframe, but a 150hp Hispano-Suiza vee engine was used for increased power. The wings were redesigned and about half a meter wider, the tailplane was altered, and the hull was strengthened. A crew of three was carried: two flight personnel and a nose gunner.

F.B.A. Type H
Schreck FBA.4 Type H 5.160 BAF BRU Msm 14.04.00R edited-2.jpg
Role Flying Boat
Manufacturer F.B.A.
Designer M.L. Schreck & A. Beaumont[1]
Introduction May 1916 [2]
Primary users ItalianRoundelGreen.png Italy
Roundel of the French Air Force before 1945.svg France
Roundel of Belgium.svg Belgium
RAF Type A Roundel.svg U.K. (RNAS)
US Army Air Roundel.svg U.S.A.
Number built >1200[2]
Developed from F.B.A. Type B
Wingspan 14.5 m (47 ft 7 in)[3]
Engine 150hp Hispano-Suiza 8A vee or
170hp Isotta-Fraschini
Armament flexible front MG and
2×35kg bombs
Crew 3
Max Speed 145 km/h (90 mph)[4][3] to 150 km/h (93 mph)[2]
Climb 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in 8:00[3]
2,000 m (6,560 ft) in 20:00[3]
Ceiling 4,900 m (16,100 ft)[2]
Range 300 km (190 mi)[4] to 450 km (280 mi)[2]

They were also used in small numbers by Belgium, Spain, the U.K., and the U.S.A.[2]

In Italy, at lest 982 were built: 38 in 1916; 367 in 1917; and 477 in 1918. A handful of Italian Type H's were shifted to the RNAS at Otranto.[1]

For more information, see Wikipedia:FBA Type H.

Game DataEdit

Wings of GloryEdit

Unofficial Stats
Availability Maneuver Damage Dmg Points Max Alt. Climb
         
16Q1-18Q4 Y B/- 14 11 6
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1:285/6mm/1:288 ScaleEdit

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ReferencesEdit

Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 Nowarra, p.122.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Davilla, p.260.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Nowarra, pp.202-203.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Munson, p.26.
Bibliography
  • Dr. James J. Davilla and Arthur M. Soltan. French Aircraft of the First World War. Flying Machines Press, 1997. ISBN 0-9637110-4-0.
  • Kenneth Munson, Flying Boats and Seaplanes since 1910. New York: The MacMillan Company, Blandford Press Ltd., 1971.
  • Heinz J. Nowarra, Bruce Robertson, and Peter G. Cooksley. Marine Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Letchworth, Herts, England: Harleyford Publications Limited, 1966. ISBN 0900435070